The world most largest biography website !

More than THREE MILLION biographies And hundreds of new biographies are added daily

Follow Us

Terence Rigby Life story


Terence Christopher Gerald Rigby was an English RADA trained actor with a number of film and television credits to his name. In the 1970s he was well known as police dog-handler PC Snow in the long-running series Softly, Softly: Taskforce

Terence Christopher Gerald Rigby (2 January 1937 – 10 August 2008) was an English RADA trained actor with a number of film and television credits to his name. In the 1970s he was well known as police dog-handler PC Snow in the long-running series Softly, Softly: Taskforce

Early life


Terence Rigby was born in Erdington, Birmingham, and was educated at St Philip's School. He did his national service in the Royal Air Force.

Career


Film roles included: Get Carter (1971), Watership Down (1978), Tomorrow Never Dies (1997), Elizabeth (1998), Mona Lisa Smile (2003) and Colour Me Kubrick (2006).

Notable TV roles include Dixon of Dock Green, Softly, Softly: Taskforce; Z-Cars, The First Lady, Callan, The Saint, Public Eye, Edward & Mrs. Simpson, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy; Airline, Rumpole of the Bailey, Boon, Lovejoy, Our Friends in the North, Born to Run, Holby City, Midsomer Murders, Crossroads, Kings Oak (playing the part of motel boss, Tommy Lancaster), The Beiderbecke Affair and The Beiderbecke Connection.

He was also Dr Watson to Tom Baker's Sherlock Holmes. The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982) was known amongst the crew as the 'Tom and Terry show'.

Among his stage credits was the role of Joey in the original Peter Hall production of Harold Pinter's The Homecoming (1965), which he repeated on Broadway in 1967. Hall later cast him as Briggs in the première of No Man's Land at the Royal National Theatre in 1975, alongside John Gielgud and Ralph Richardson. The production played on Broadway the following year. Rigby received considerable acclaim for his portrayal of Joseph Stalin in another National Theatre production, Robert Bolt's State of Revolution in 1977, opposite Michael Bryant. He returned twice more to Broadway, first in 1995, doubling as the Ghost, the Player King, and the Gravedigger in Jonathan Kent's Almeida production of Hamlet, starring Ralph Fiennes; and then again in 1999 as Count Orsini-Rosenberg in Peter Hall's production of Amadeus, starring David Suchet and Michael Sheen.Segments from Rigby's abbreviated autobiography, begun shortly before his death, are included in the book by his long-time friend, the television and radio dramatist Juliet Ace, Rigby Shlept Here: A Memoir of Terence Rigby 1937–2008. Along with correspondence and interviews with his friends and theatrical colleagues, Ace's memoir draws on her own diaries and shows much of the working actor and private man who remained a mystery to those close to him. It was published in November, 2014.

Death


Rigby died at home in London on 10 August 2008 of lung cancer.

Partial filmography


References


External links


Terence Rigby at IMDb

BBC News, actor Terence Rigby has died

Terence Rigby website – now archived

Obituary in The Telegraph

Obituary in The Guardian

Obituary in The Times

Obituary in The Stage

Obituary in The Independent

Terence Rigby interview, Theatre Archive Project, British Library

Rigby Shlept Here: A Memoir of Terence Rigby 1937–2008, Amazon, 2014, ASIN: B00Q25491I

News about Terence Rigby


.

Terence Rigby Photos

© 2015 xwhos.com