David the Invincible

David The Invincible

Philosopher



  • Photos
    David the Invincible - Philosopher
    David the Invincible - Philosopher
    David the Invincible - Philosopher
    David the Invincible - Philosopher
    David the Invincible - Philosopher
David the Invincible Profiles
social profile link xwhos
  • About

    David the Invincible was a neoplatonist philosopher of the 6th century. David was a pupil of Olympiodorus in Alexandria. His works, originally written in Greek, survive in medieval Armenian translation, and he was given the byname of "invincible" in the Armenian tradition, which considers David himself an Armenian.

    Detail from wiki

    David the Invincible (or David the Philosopher) was a neoplatonist philosopher of the 6th century.David was a pupil of Olympiodorus in Alexandria. His works, originally written in Greek, survive in medieval Armenian translation, and he was given the byname of "invincible" (Classical Armenian: Անյաղթ; reformed: Անհաղթ, Anhağt) in the Armenian tradition, which considers David himself an Armenian.

    Due to confusion with other authors called David and due to an abundant body of medieval legend, almost nothing is known with certainty about the historical David. Armenian tradition makes him a native of Taron, but this is not substantiated in contemporary sources and may be due to conflation with another person.

    He was active in Alexandria in Byzantine Egypt, known as an expert in Aristotle's Physics.

    He supposedly received the byname "invincible" for his exceptional oratory and argumentative skills. David is said to have returned to his native Armenia later in life, where he was active as a teacher, but he was persecuted by the church and ultimately died in exile in Haghbat.Of the number of works attributed to him, many are pseudepigraphic or doubtful.

    The works which can be attributed to him with certainty or at least with some plausibility are not scholarly treatises but propedeutic (introductory) handbooks for use in teaching beginners.

    They were composed in Greek but survive only in Armenian translation.

    Philologically, these translations are important representatives of the "Hellenizing" tradition in Armenian literature (Yownaban Dproc‘) of the 6th to 8th centuries.The David Anhaght Medal, the highest-ranking medal granted by the Armenian Academy of Philosophy, is named after him. David the Invincible (Դավիթ Անհաղթ - David Anhaght, Armenfilm) is a 1978 film by Levon Mkrtchyan.

    Bibliography


    Gertz, Sebastian (2017), Elias and David: Introductions to Philosophy with Olympiodorus: Introduction to Logic, Bloomsbury Academic, ISBN 9781350136441

    Topchyan, Aram (2010), David the Invincible, Commentary on Aristotle's Prior Analytics, Brill, ISBN 9789004187191

    Muradyan, Gohar (2014), David the Invincible Commentary on Porphyry's Isagoge, Brill, ISBN 9789004280885

    Sanjian, Avedis K. (1986), David Anhaght', the 'Invincible' Philosopher, Atlanta, Georgia: Scholars' Press, ISBN 1555400671

    Barnes, Jonathan (2009), L'oeuvre de David l'Invincible et la transmission de la pensée grecque dans la tradition arménienne et syriaque, Brill, ISBN 9789004160477 (in French)

    Benedetta, Contin (2011). La version arménienne des œuvres grecques de David l'Invincible. Recherches sur la formation du vocabulaire épistémologique arménien (PDF) (Thesis). University of Geneva. (in French)

  • Photos
    David the Invincible - Philosopher
    David the Invincible - Philosopher
    David the Invincible - Philosopher
    David the Invincible - Philosopher
    David the Invincible - Philosopher
© 2015 xwhos.com
About us Help